Why I Haven’t Said Much

I made this blog fully intending to use it as I described in my opening post. I even have several ideas for entries floating in my head, but quite frankly, I have not felt at all motivated to write them, and I think I understand why. At first, I just thought I was distracted or simply feeling too happy in general to post the rather depressive stuff I’ve thought of, but that isn’t the reason. It’s because everything I’ve thought of relates to events, beliefs, and problems that occurred in the past and I’m tired of dwelling on all of that stuff. It was primarily negative and while it is good for the purposes of self-reflection to think about things like that, I’ve done that enough. I’m tired of giving my former beliefs any time in my thoughts, even in critical blog posts. It’s in the past, with the exception of some stubborn mindsets from then that I’m still trying to squash, and that is where it all needs to stay. I’ve changed, I’ve gotten all the benefits I can from analyzing all of that stuff, and the time has now come to move the hell on from all of it as best as I can. Therefore, I don’t anticipate posting here much, if at all. Sorry to those few folks who I see in my visitor history come here daily, (Assuming they’re people and not bots.) but I’ve got nothing to say.

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Why I Haven’t Said Much

The Meaning of “Unequally Yoked”

This is an old post that I wrote back in November in the aftermath of my post on permarital sex for iMonk. Since I’m admittedly a bit starved for material to write about at the moment, I suppose this is as good a thing as any to talk about.

Here’s a thought inspired by something StuartB said in my premarital sex post. What is “unequally yoked” anyway? Assuming for the moment that it means what I was always taught that it means which is not to marry non-Christians, I wonder about how the evolution of society, specifically the creation of the numerous denominations and different ways of understanding the Bible has impacted how this concept should be examined. In my fundigelical education, it was said that this concept is meant to warn against marrying non-believers because of all of the assorted problems it could cause due to conflicting views, (Which typically meant, upon reading into it a little, that non-believers may not share the same political views as fundigelicals.) but with how many different views on Christianity have arisen, couldn’t these same issues arise among a Christian couple with differing theological views just as easily? For example, an SBC evangelical may have some pretty severe disagreements with an Eastern Orthodox or a liberal Episcopalian. They may both believe in God, but they may do so in vastly different ways that aren’t compatible with living a life together. On the other side of the coin, a post-evangelical may have more in common beliefs-wise with an agnostic than an SBC evangelical, so which of these potential relationships has a higher likelihood for problems? I’d say that it is probably the one with the SBCer and the post-evangelical, assuming the relationships are equal in other non-theological ways. In fact, one might say that they are so different as to be “unequally yoked.” I’m not entirely sure what to make of this thought and I may be starting out with the wrong premise to begin with anyway. Anyone else have anything to say about this?

The Meaning of “Unequally Yoked”

Introduction

Welcome my friends. So rather than continuing to accumulate various thoughts on theology in my brain and hijacking the Saturday Ramblings entries over on Internet Monk to discuss them, I have decided to try out WordPress once again. I can’t promise that I’ll post with any sort of regularity, but if I do happen to think of something and possess the time to write about it, I will do so. I may also post about music, my college experience, baseball, or the WWE if I feel like it, so be prepared for those sort of off-topic posts as well.

As far as the title of the blog is concerned, there are a few different meanings to it. It does not indicate a transition to atheism like one may assume. It refers to my journey from evangelicalism to what one could potentially describe as more “liberal” viewpoints. (Although I personally despise applying the left/right spectrum from politics to religion.) Many evangelicals would probably say that I’m straying from the faith, becoming lukewarm, or perhaps that I’m not nor was I ever truly a Christian. Hence, in their eyes, I am desanctified and I’m glad to be so.

In case you’re not familiar with me from elsewhere, allow me to introduce myself. I’m Vega Magnus. I’m a twenty-one year old accounting student from South Carolina. I was homeschooled for my entire life and while I won’t say anything against the concept of homeschooling, I have issues with the cult-ish far-right aspects of it, part of which I saw through my use of A Beka curriculum. I never really saw myself as a fundamentalist at the time and I saw a lost of their beliefs for the insanity that they were, but I actually absorbed more of their views than I realized at the time. It all went bad in early 2012 when I took their beliefs on total depravity to their rational conclusion; if the world is hopelessly screwed up and if humanity is mostly hopelessly screwed up, then what really is the point of living? Once you’ve avoided hell by becoming a Christian, you might as well just end it all. One doesn’t exactly develop a healthy view of other people either because one is constantly sin-sniffing and judging the hell out of people when in that culture as well. I eventually dealt with the mental anguish I was going through by just trying really hard not to think about it and that worked for a while, but in February 2013, I decided I was uncomfortable with that and began seeking out more answers, which led me to The Christian Monist and Internet Monk. I was incredibly relieved to finally find some theology that I could identify with and acquire some degree of peace of mind through. Since then, I’ve become what could almost be considered a Christian agnostic, I suppose. I don’t claim to have the all of the answers, but I do trust that God will sort everything out as well as it can be sorted. I still have some issues that I’ll discuss in time, but that is a decent overview of who I am, what I come from, and where I am now.

Thanks for reading and stay tuned for some proper entries in the future.

Introduction